Black Slaveowners: Free Black Slave Masters in South - download pdf or read online

By Larry Koger

ISBN-10: 0899501605

ISBN-13: 9780899501604

Have been black masters diversified from white? An research of all facets and especially of the commercialism of black slaveowning debunks the parable that black slaveholding used to be a benevolent establishment in accordance with kinship, and explains the transition of black masters from slavery to paid exertions.

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New PDF release: Black Slaveowners: Free Black Slave Masters in South

Have been black masters diversified from white? An research of all points and especially of the commercialism of black slaveowning debunks the parable that black slaveholding used to be a benevolent establishment in line with kinship, and explains the transition of black masters from slavery to paid exertions.

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Extra info for Black Slaveowners: Free Black Slave Masters in South Carolina 1790-1860

Sample text

Merchant was reported by the census taker of 1840 to be the owner of two slaves. Within ten years, he sold the slaves and moved to Colleton District. While some free blacks moved to different parts of the state, others simply left the state and settled in Northern cities. Shortly after Thomas Hanscome purchased a slave named James from the estate of his mother-in-law, Martha Inglis, he left the state and moved to Philadelphia in 1845. Before his departure, he requested that John G. Garden should be given the power to manage his slaves and other investments) Between 1850 and 1860, the number of black slaveholders decreased from 297 to 171, which was a loss of 126 slaveowners or a decline of 42 percent.

26 Yet a few aspects of his accounts were slightly overstated. For example, he overestimated the number of slaves owned by James Pendarvis. According to the first federal census, Pendarvis owned 123 slaves and not 200 slaves as the duke reported in his book. Furthermore, the federal enumerator did not refer to James Pendarvis as a free Negro but as a white man. The federal censuses of 1790 and 1800 as well as the tax lists of 1785 and 1786 reported James Pendarvis and his family not as free persons of color but as white persons.

When the slaves were owned by a corporation or trust estate, the name of the corporation or trustee was to be recorded. ' In general, the federal enumerations provide an array of statistical information to be compiled and analyzed, but the information can be misleading. For example, statistics on the number of free black heads of household owning slaves can be deceiving when compiled from the federal enumerations from 1790 through 1840. The problem stems from the fact that slaves recorded in family dwellings were occasionally held by more than one member of the free household.

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Black Slaveowners: Free Black Slave Masters in South Carolina 1790-1860 by Larry Koger


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